National Articles

Economist Article – The mindfulness business – Western capitalism is looking for inspiration in eastern mysticism

20131116_WBD000_1

 

by Schumpeter

The mindfulness business

Western capitalism is looking for inspiration in eastern mysticism

IN HIS 1905 book, “The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism”, Max Weber credited the Protestant ethic with giving rise to capitalism. Now it sometimes seems as if it is the Buddhist ethic that is keeping capitalism going. The Protestants stressed rational calculation and self-restraint. The Buddhists stress the importance of “mindfulness”—taking time out from the hurly-burly of daily activities to relax and meditate. In today’s corporate world you are more likely to hear about mindfulness than self-restraint.

Google offers an internal course called “search inside yourself” that has proved so popular that the company has created entry-level versions such as “neural self-hacking” and “managing your energy”. The search giant has also built a labyrinth for walking meditation. EBay has meditation rooms equipped with pillows and flowers. Twitter and Facebook are doing all they can to stay ahead in the mindfulness race. Evan Williams, one of Twitter’s founders, has introduced regular meditation sessions in his new venture, the Obvious Corporation, a start-up incubator and investment vehicle.

The fashion is not confined to Silicon Valley: the mindfulness movement can be found in every corner of the corporate world. Rupert Murdoch has a well-developed bullshit detector. But earlier this year he tweeted about his interest in transcendental meditation (which he said “everyone recommends”). Ray Dalio of Bridgewater Associates and Bill Gross of PIMCO are two of the biggest names in the money-management business, and both are regular meditators. Mr Dalio says it has had more impact on his success than anything else.

Continue reading

Mindfulness Time Magazine Cover Story February 2014

1101140203_600
Time Magazine
The Mindful Revolution
Finding peace in a stressed-out, digitally dependent
culture may just be a matter of thinking differently
By Kate Pickert Monday, Feb. 03, 2014
Follow @TIME

 

The raisins sitting in my sweaty palm are getting stickier by the minute. They don’t look

particularly appealing, but when instructed by my teacher, I take one in my fingers and examine

it. I notice that the raisin’s skin glistens. Looking closer, I see a small indentation where it once

hung from the vine. Eventually, I place the raisin in my mouth and roll the wrinkly little shape

over and over with my tongue, feeling its texture. After a while, I push it up against my teeth and

slice it open. Then, finally, I chew–very slowly.

 

Continue reading

2014- The Year of Mindfulness

2014 Mindful Living copy

 by Carolyn Gregoire from the Huffington Post

Mindfulness, it seems, is having a moment. 2013 saw a significant spike of interest in holistic health and mindfulness practices like yoga and meditation (not to mention a number of celebrities and CEOs hopping on the mindfulness bandwagon) and it’s a trend that will likely continue to gain momentum in 2014.

“What the culture is craving is a sense of ease and reflection, of not needing to be stimulated or entertained or going after something constantly,” Soren Gordhamer, founder of the Wisdom 2.0 conference, told the New York Times. “Nobody’s kicking out technology, but we have to regain our connection to others and to nature or else everybody loses.”

Here are five reasons that mindfulness will change the world this upcoming year.

Continue reading